The Global Warming Jacket

Can a gal have too many cardigans? Maybe, maybe not. But I do get tired of grabbing one day after day, especially when that’s all we to need to keep ourselves warm for most of our fall and winter days in here in inland SoCal. As an alternative to a cardie, I made a lightweight, unlined jacket for Fresh Make #20.DSC_0598DSC_0576DSC_0590 The pattern I used is Butterick 5617. I bought it several months ago at JoAnn’s on sale for $1.40. I was drawn to this pattern because of it’s loose fit and hip length, a style that is usually flattering on me. I named it the Global Warming Jacket because, like I already mentioned, cold days here in Southern California seem to be getting fewer and farther between. The El Ninos they kept predicting never come. If I spend my time making a jacket, I want to actually get lots of wear out of it.

I made view C/D.

I made view C/D so I can wear the sleeves long or rolled up.

I purchased the fabric at The Fabric Store on La Brea Avenue in Los Angeles. It is a medium weight twill linen, and unbeknownst to me when I bought it, it’s stretchy – quite stretchy, in fact. I have never encountered linen with Lycra. The pattern required 1 3/4 yards. I thought I was paying $12 per yard, but when the sales clerk rang me up, the total including tax came to $13.73. It turns out the fabric was 40% off that day! This was one inexpensive linen jacket. At my own risk, I pre-washed the fabric in the washing machine in cold water and hung dry.

I love to dye fabrics as much as I love to sew. I couldn't resist putting some hand-dyed covered buttons on this jacket.

I love to dye fabrics as much as I love to sew. I couldn’t resist putting some hand-dyed covered buttons on this jacket.

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The back has four separate pieces which create a nice fit and style.

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The collar consists of an under-collar piece and a separate band.

The collar consists of an under-collar piece and a separate band.

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LET’S BE HONEST:
1. I cut out size 12 with no alterations. I was more concerned that it fit well on top than it being a little snug through the hips. I imagine it being worn unbuttoned most of the time anyway. (If you’ve read my previous posts, you know that I’m a 16/18 on my bottom half.)

2. This stretchy Lycra is interesting to work with. It can stretch out while sewing, but just as easily steams back into shape. I had to hand baste close to where I was going to machine top stitch to prevent the top layer of fabric from pulling and creating puckers. Also, the fabric snagged fairly easily.

3. The illustrations of the collar on views B,C and D are inaccurate. The corners are rounded, and it is attached to a neckband. If you look closely, the line illustration at the beginning of the instructions shows this more accurately. I actually love the rounded collar, so I’m not complaining.

4. Twice I sewed the top of the pockets on the wrong place on the front panels. I didn’t match the correct snips together. I was worried there would be permanent marks on the fabric where I took the stitches out. Luckily where weren’t.

I love this jacket. The stretch in the linen makes it as comfortable as any cardie. There will be lots of days this fall, winter and spring that I will be wearing it!

Thanks for reading this post. As always, I welcome your comments. Any plans for making some outerwear this fall or winter? Cheers, Lori

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The Tina Jacket

I was tired of putting on the same fleece jacket I wore to high school track meets to go out for a casual dinner or an evening movie, so I decided Fresh Make #2 would be a jacket.

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For the pattern I used McCall’s 6657 which I purchased at JoAnn’s for $1.40 as part of the 5 patterns for $7 sale. I have named this pattern The Tina Jacket because my dear friend Tina had been wearing a cute, short wool jacket the last few times I have seen her on a casual, winter’s evening. I thought to myself, “I want a jacket like Tina’s.”

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I made view C.

I bought the fabric at one of my all time favorite fabric stores, Michael Levine in downtown L. A.. The fabric is a thick brown and gold, heather flannel. Perfect for So Cal! It cost $9.00 per yard. I bought 4, but really needed only 3 1/2. (The pattern only gave yardage amounts for 60″ wide fabric, and this was 45″, so I generously guessed on how much I needed.)

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DSC_0006I had a ton of fun making this jacket. I had not done a collar with a lapel in years.

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LET’S BE HONEST:

1. This McCall’s pattern is rated “EASY.” In the world of jacket and coat making it is easy, but it is not a beginner sewing project by any means. This is an unstructured, unlined jacket and does not require any advanced tailoring techniques, but successful execution the collar, set-in sleeves, top-stitching, etc…does require some intermediate sewing skills.

2. YAY! In this pattern, I’m a “S(8 -10)” If you have read my Jean Skirt post, you will know that my bottom half measurements literally translate to a size 16/18! Β I’m a bit pear shaped, but if you see me walking around town, I don’t look THAT out of portion. So again, they are only numbers!

3. I made a few adjustments to the pattern. First, I discovered when I began working on the collar that one side was about one inch longer than the other! I thought this was the oddest thing ever. I then studied the illustration on the pattern envelope, and it does show one side longer! I am not opposed to asymmetry, but in this case, the difference was too slight as to look like it might be a mistake. Besides an asymmetrical collar was not what I had in mind, so I trimmed the longer side and made them even. Second, I shorten the sleeve on the pattern piece about 3/4″ before I cut it out with the fabric. Third, I put buttons on instead of toggles. Last, I made a 2″ hem instead of the 1 1/4″ width indicated on the pattern.

Overall, I am super happy with my Tina Jacket. Thank you for taking the time to read this post. I welcome your feedback!